Is It Common For Attorneys To Tell Clients They Need A Reality Check?

Is It Common For Attorneys To Tell Clients They Need A Reality Check?

Dear Attorneys,

I hired an attorney to help me with my custody matter, and they just haven’t been doing what I want them to do. I hired them to get me the agreement that I want, and when we last talked, they told me the exact opposite of what I want to hear. They even told me they had to give me a “reality check!” Is this common, or should I find someone else?

Very Truly Yours,

Checked and Checking Out

 

Dear Checked,

We completely understand why that can seem frustrating or off-putting, especially when you are already dealing with a custody battle. However, you hire an attorney to advise you and help you through your case, and those recommendations may not always match up with what you want.  There are certainly some attorneys who will be a “yes man” for you and just tell you what you want to hear, but ultimately, that could set your case back and cost you additional time, and/or money.

Giving a client “a reality check” is sometimes necessary, especially if you are expecting an outcome that your attorney knows is not realistic. There may have been a way to break that down for you in a more polite way, but if you have an attorney who doesn’t “sugarcoat” things, it might be common for them to say something like that to a client.

If you feel as though you need to find a new attorney, that is completely up to you. You should work with someone who you feel is a good fit for you. We always tell clients that you have to be comfortable with your attorney and you should feel as though you have built a good rapport with him or her.  We wish you the best of luck with your case, and should you need a confidential consultation, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Very Truly Yours,

Wolf & Shore Law Group

 

*The situations represented in our Dear Attorneys column are entirely fictional and any resemblance to a specific case is unintentional. We cannot, and will not, offer legal advice to anyone who is not a client. However, if you do have questions or concerns, you should contact an attorney at your convenience.

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